Disaster recovery

  • Australian Fires - Here's how you can help

    Thank you for your concern for our fellow Australians affected by the devastating fires currently ravaging across the country. Read more on how you can support those impacted.

  • Australian Fires - Volunteering - Here's how you can help

    Thank you for your concern for our fellow Australians affected by the devastating fires currently ravaging across the country. Read more on how you can support those impacted.

  • Logan SES

    Born in Sudan, freedom and security was something that was not a given in Emmanuel Andrew’s life. But since volunteering with the Logan City State Emergency Service (SES), he has found a place in the community that will not only help others, but connection which he had always longed for. Watch now!

  • Medals for Flood Heroes

    In August this year, the Governor-General of Australia awarded a record 44 National Emergency Medals to the volunteers of Brisbane Coast Guard, for their critical work saving lives and property throughout the worst of the Brisbane Flood Emergency in January 2011.

    This is a record – the largest number of Federal medals ever awarded to any Coast Guard Flotilla, in the 50-year history of the Australian Volunteer Coast Guard Association.

  • Be Prepared

    Be Prepared is a straightforward facilitated process which invites community to answer the question: How will your community work together to plan how you will support each other before, during and after disasters? This unique approach to building resilience is focused on community-level activity rather than individual preparedness.

  • PPRR explained

    Disasters have a cyclic four stage lifecycle. Understanding this lifecycle helps us to be prepared for disasters, respond safely and recover quickly and effectively.

    At each stage there are different things to know, different actions we should take and different ways we connect with people. These stages can change rapidly and often overlap.

  • People Recovery = Physical Recovery

    People recovery is the most important thing and sometimes to help with people recovery we need to help with property recovery - Joe, Global Care

    Global Care opened up shop in Grantham a few days after the devestating inland tsumami destroyed small Lockyer Valley town. They have been operating ever since and will be there for many months to come.

    Since January, the team out there has:

    • Worked on over 500 jobs with volunteers
    • Had 380 clients
    • Worked with more than 1500-1800 volunteers
  • Rotary Capalaba

    During the floods, the Capalaba Rotary Club found multiple ways to help the community, and they continue to play an ongoing role supporting community recovery.

    Their contributions include working directly with homeowners as the flood waters peaked and receded. Their numbers grew as the days progressed and their tireless volunteers working in several communities including West End and Rocklea. They held a combined Rotary Garage Sale over two weekends which raised $93,000!

  • Flood victim joins volunteer community

    Sarah Borg watched as her house and her street disappeared under water during the recent Brisbane floods.

    During February, unable to fix her own house, the 23 year-old nurse arranged to join the volunteer effort in Warwick.

    "It was a time where we couldn't do anything else, so while I couldn't do anything on our house, I thought if I went and helped someone else it would be a way of saying thank you for the other people helping us," she said.

  • ShelterBox

    One of our most basic needs as humans is shelter. Since its inception in 2000, ShelterBox has provided emergency shelter for victims of earthquakes, floods, tsunamis, typhoons, hurricanes, volcanoes and conflicts. 

    A ShelterBox contains a range of equipment necessary to survive, including a disaster relief tent for a family of up to 10 people, a basic tool kit, thermal blankets and a stove.